Edmonton Journal- June 10, 2017

Celeigh Cardinal clicks perfectly with Everything and Nothing at All

The re­lease for Edmonton soul and folksinger Celeigh Car­di­nal’s lat­est al­bum is on Saturday at the Forge on Whyte.

It’s a hard life, so some­times what you need is a dose of rock and roll, rhythm and blues, heart­felt and real, talk­ing about the things that make us all tick and sput­ter.

Celeigh Car­di­nal’s bold­ly­named new al­bum Ev­ery­thing and Noth­ing at All is just this, a time­less summer jam of straigh­ta­head rockers, blues shuf­fles and a couple heart­break­ers on the edge of coun­try, each of which shows off Car­di­nal’s soar­ing and con­fi­dent vo­cal range, which she de­ploys with­out pre­ten­sion over a bunch of great lyrics.

A lot of things make this al­bum click — we’ve talked about Car­di­nal’s voice, which is lus­cious, full and a lit­tle mis­chievous around the edges — but the play­ing on th­ese straight­for­ward songs is solid, too, with hints of the Trag­i­cally Hip on the acous­tic side. Ev­ery song goes just a lit­tle fur­ther than it could. But the end, a bit of in­die edge in a Gi­ant Sand way with the group vo­cals, for ex­am­ple, on One Man, re­in­forces a theme of mak­ing it through bad re­la­tion­ships found through­out the record.

Would You Be My Dog?, a blues num­ber, is charm­ing and ro­man­tic, not­ing that we’re all each other’s dogs in part­ner­ships, while the slightly raunchy Be My Man has lyrics which work on both su­per­fi­cial and ex­is­ten­tial lev­els: “Are you de­serv­ing of a lover? Did you suf­fer more than an­other? Or will you ever?” Great song, stem to stern. I re­ally like the way she writes, and you can imag­ine her play­ing In­ter­stel­lar or the folk fest with ease.

Would You Be My Dog?, a blues num­ber, is charm­ing and ro­man­tic, not­ing that we’re all each other’s dogs in part­ner­ships, while the slightly raunchy Be My Man has lyrics which work on both su­per­fi­cial and ex­is­ten­tial lev­els: “Are you de­serv­ing of a lover? Did you suf­fer more than an­other? Or will you ever?” Great song, stem to stern. I re­ally like the way she writes, and you can imag­ine her play­ing In­ter­stel­lar or the folk fest with ease.

The sort-of ti­tle track Ev­ery­thing squeezes a reg­gae beat in, mix­ing soul, pop and some­thing else into some­thing beau­ti­fully sad.

Per­fect for bars — Car­di­nal’s re­lease is Saturday at the Forge on Whyte — and fes­ti­val stages, she’s one of the acts at Abo­rig­i­nal Day at Vic­to­ria Park June 21 be­fore head­ing off to Smur­fland at North Coun­try Fair that week­end.

Can’t wait to hear more — do your­self a favour and get on board, which you can do with ease here.

 

Daily Herald Tribune - May 8, 2017

ENTERTAINMENT LOCAL

Cardinal launches debut CD 

By Diana Rinne, Grande Prairie Daily Herald Tribune

Celeigh Cardinal
Photo courtesy East Meets West Photography

Celeigh Cardinal Photo courtesy East Meets West Photography

 

It’s been a long road for Grande Prairie’s Celeigh Cardinal. From her early days with local band Bella Bella, the singer/songwriter, now based in Edmonton, has had some twists, turns and detours before arriving at her destination.

Cardinal will launch her debut album Everything and Nothing At All in her hometown next weekend at Better Than Fred’s.

“I’m very excited and very overwhelmed,” she chuckled.

The album has been in the works since Cardinal released a five song EP in 2011. “Life is so crazy and there’s always so much happening,” she said. “I applied for so many grants and never got any so I was always trying to raise the money on my own.”

In 2015, Cardinal’s boyfriend at the time, Dylan Farrell, started a GoFundMe campaign for the album. “It changed everything,” she said.

It was shortly after, however, that Cardinal had to take a break from singing for eight months because she developed nodules on her vocal chords.

The GoFundMe account raised about $5,000 which allowed Cardinal to start the recording process.

“We did all the bed tracks and then wound up just kind of waiting things out a bit, letting life happen. We recorded the vocals in my bedroom of my new apartment and sent them to our producer and he mixed them and we are finally here,” she said.

With such a length of time between the recordings, some of the songs evolved and changed a bit, but Cardinal is more than happy with the end product.

“Everything seems to be really good. It’s turned out really great. I’ve heard the masters and it’s awesome ... I’m so excited!” she said.

Well known for her big voice and soulful performances, Cardinal said the album is very much biographical with an eclectic range that reflects her varied musical influences.

“All of my songs tend to be...they are a commentary on my life, love, all the things that happen and they are stories about me,” she explained. “The fact that it’s me narrating them throughout the entire album is the common thread. But what has happened is all the songs are kind of different. We have a reggae song, we have a song that’s almost like an AC/DC style of rock, there is something that is pretty country.

“It’s hard to describe because the songs are so different, but there is that common thread that is...me tying them all together.”

Things have really ramped up for Cardinal in the past year with a stint at the Banff Centre for the Arts as part of the ReClaim program, and a grant from ATB Financial and Alberta Music in October, and most recently a REVEAL Indigenous Arts Award from the Hnatyshyn Foundation.

“Honestly, it’s such an amazing boost,” said the full-time musician who also plays the Bear Creek Folk Festival this summer and will be heading to Sweden for a showcase at the end of August.

“I feel things are really going on the upswing,” she said.

Cardinal hosts a couple of open stages in Edmonton during the week and plays on the weekends with her trio featuring Ben Tassell and Matt Harrison, as well as with The Mad Dog Experience, a tribute to Joe Cocker.

“Basically I spend my entire day sitting in front of the computer emailing people asking them for gigs. Doing all the booking stuff is the most time consuming thing ever,” she said. “But I’m looking at my calendar these days and looking at CD release shows and looking at going to Sweden and playing festivals, and all this work that I’ve put in is finally starting come to fruition.”

Cardinal will launch Everything and Nothing At All, with Ben Tassell, Dana Wylie, Matt Blackie and Ryan Funk joining her on stage, on May 12 and 13 at Better Than Fred’s.

For more check out www.celeighcardinal.com.

drinne@postmedia.com

 

Edmonton Metro - June 20, 2017

Metro News

News / Edmonton

'It allowed us to start celebrating it again' Indigenous performers embrace culture for National Aboriginal Day 

Celeigh Cardinal is performing at Edmonton's National Aboriginal Day and hopes to empower Indigenous youth with her performance. 

'It allowed us to start celebrating it again' Indigenous performers embrace culture for National Aboriginal Day

KEVIN TUONG/FOR METRO

Celeigh Cardinal, a local singer/songwriter who will be performing during National Aboriginal Day.

By:  Metro, Published on Tue Jun 20 2017

As part of National Aboriginal Day, cities across Canada are celebrating Indigenous culture.

But two local performers recognize that has not always been the case.

Celeigh Cardinal, who is Métis, and Jenna Broomfield, who is Inuit, are both performing in Edmonton this week as part of the city's Aboriginal Day celebrations. Both say reconnecting with their Indigenous culture brought a greater appreciation for what their people have gone through.

Cardinal, who is playing the main stage in Victoria Park Wednesday, said her father grew up in a white Christian foster home, so didn't emphasize their Indigenous roots. The singer-songwriter said experiencing racism due to looking Indigenous made her ashamed of her ancestry.

She reconnected with her roots through learning from elders while working at the Friendship Centre in Grande Prairie.

“They absolutely touched my heart with the things they were teaching … I connected to what they were saying. And that experience helped rid me of all the shame I had growing up,” she said.

She said the experience contributed to a stronger sense of self worth, strengthened her spiritual beliefs and provided a greater understanding of her self.

“I feel more empowered about who I am and how people see me. And I want to be a positive role model for youth — I want to be somebody who is seen, so other girls can feel like they can do these things,” she said.

Related

Jenna Broomfield (right) performing with Malaya Bishop as the Sila Singers, a throat singing (katajjaq) duo.

COURTESY FACEBOOK 

Jenna Broomfield (right) performing with Malaya Bishop as the Sila Singers, a throat singing (katajjaq) duo. 

Broomfield, who performs Inuit throat singing, says the experiences of residential school survivors, such as her grandparents, have impacted multiple generations.

“There are generations of our people who grew up not being proud of being Indigenous. If you’re ashamed of something, you’re not going to showcase it."

Although she grew up with traditional foods and teachings, she didn’t know much about the Inuktitut language or the traditions of storytelling and song.

“There was definitely a piece that was missing, it was something I craved and something I needed,” Broomfield said. “And it’s something that grounds me today.”

She sees the national celebration as an opportunity to reaffirm the importance of Indigenous peoples in Canada’s cultural history.

“As a performer, it’s important to take opportunities like National Aboriginal Day to amplify messages in our community that Canadians may not normally take time to listen to,” she said.

She said while members of her family remembered songs or stories, it was not something “outwardly celebrated”. That has changed, as she has now reintroduced the cultural teachings to her parents’ generation.

“The fact that I was a young person wanting to learn about (our culture) was a big step forward in our family and our community. Because it allowed us to start celebrating it again.”

On Tuesday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced that National Aboriginal Day would be called National Indigenous Peoples Day going forward.